Search

Weekend King Racing

PREMIUM INTERNATIONAL HORSE RACING TIPS

Tag

st leger

2019 “Grand Slams” International Horse Racing Dates, Champions & Replays

 

 

 

Pegasus World Cup

pegasus-world-cup-invitational.png

When: January 26
Where: Gulfstream Park, Florida, US
What: Formerly the richest race in the world, with a purse of $12 million for its inaugural running in 2017, increased to $16M in 2018. ​It’s a 1 1⁄8-mile (9 furlongs) race on dirt and is open to horses four years old and up.
For the 2019 edition, the format was revamped, with a purse of $9M for the original race and $7M available for a turf equivalent.

2019 winner: CITY OF LIGHT

Cheltenham Festival

Magners-horizontal-Cheltenham-logo-1024x328.jpg

When: March 12-15
Where: Cheltenham, UK
What: The world’s most celebrated jump meeting is a four-day feast of racing and revelry attracting huge crowds of Irish and British punters to the attractive track in the Cotswolds region of Gloucestershire. The festival’s showpiece is the coveted Cheltenham Gold Cup, a three-mile marathon over 22 fences. Last year’s winner was Native River.

2019 Cheltenham Gold Cup winner: AL BOUM PHOTO

When: March 30
Where: Meydan, Dubai
What: Billed as the world’s richest day of racing, the lucrative event holds a special place in the Dubai racing calendar and ends the United Arab Emirates racing season. The race is run on dirt over 2,000 meters (about 10 furlongs). Godolphin’s Thunder Snow is the reigning champion.

2019 winner: THUNDER SNOW

When: April 6 & April 13
Where: Sydney, AUS
What: The Championships was inaugurated in 2014 as a “Grand Finals” concept to feature and showcase the very best of Australian racing as the jewel in the crown of Sydney’s Autumn Carnival. Held on the first and second Saturday of April each year, The Championships’ twelve races will be hotly contested to determine champion status over different age groups and distances. With a total of $21 million prize money on offer, the stage is set for two days of exciting and highly competitive racing. The feature race of the two days of racing, the “Grand Final” in the AUD$4,500,000 Queen Elizabeth Stakes.

2019 Queen Elizabeth Stakes winner: WINX

When: April 6
Where: Aintree, UK
What: Perhaps the most famous horse race in the world and an icon of the British sporting calendar. First, run in 1839, the epic race is best known for its huge jumps such as Becher’s Brook, Valentine’s and The Chair and is a four-mile slog over two laps of the famous Liverpool course. It’s the race that transcends racing, with generations of people taking a once-a-year interest in the sport of kings. Last year’s winner was Tiger Roll.

2019 winner: TIGER ROLL

When: May 4
Where: Churchill Downs, USA
What: The Kentucky Derby is one of the world’s most iconic races. The mile-and-a-quarter dash on dirt, dubbed “the most exciting two minutes in sports,” carries a first prize of $1.425 million. Last year’s champion was Triple Crown winner Justify.

2019 winner: COUNTRY HOUSE* (On Protest)

2000 Guineas

2000-guineas-stakes-2019.jpg

When: May 4
Where: Newmarket, UK
What: First run in 1809, the Group 1 race — the first Classic of the UK Flat season — is open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies and is run over one mile on turf. In theory, it is the first leg of the British Triple Crown, along with the Derby and St Leger, but the feat of winning all three has rarely been attempted in recent years. Saxon Warrior, trained by Aidan O’Brien, won last year’s race.

2019 winner: MAGNA GRECIA

When: May 5
Where: Newmarket, UK
What: Also held in Newmarket, the mile Classic for three-year-old fillies over turf has been staged since 1814. Billesdon Brook ran out the winner last time.

2019 winner: HERMOSA

When: May 18
Where: Baltimore, USA
What: As the middle leg of the Triple Crown, the Preakness is a true test of perseverance. It traditionally comes just two weeks after the Kentucky Derby and all eyes are on the race to see whether a rare treble is still on the cards. Justify kept such hopes alive in 2018.

2019 winner: WAR OF WILL

Epsom Oaks

2019-investec-epsom-derby-and-oaks.jpg

When: May 31
Where: Epsom, UK
What: The third UK Classic of the season and the second open to three-year-old fillies only. It’s been run over a distance of 1 mile, 4 furlongs and 6 yards on the grass of Epsom Downs since 1779. Forever Together, trained by Aidan O’Brien, won the latest edition.

2019 winner: ANAPURNA

Epsom Derby

2019-investec-epsom-derby-and-oaks.jpg

When: June 1
Where: Epsom, UK
What: The Epsom Derby has long been regarded as the richest and most prestigious Flat race in the British racing calendar. Run over a mile-and-a-half, it carries a prize fund of at least $1.9 million, with the winner claiming just north of $1 million. The reigning champion is Masar.

2019 winner: ANTHONY VAN DYCK

Belmont Stakes

BelmontFestivalLogo2019.jpg

When: June 8
Where: Belmont Park, USA
What: The lucrative horse race is open to three-year-olds and is the third and final leg of the famous Triple Crown. It has crowned a plethora of champions since its inauguration in 1853 — with Justify completing the treble in 2018.

2019 winner: Sir Winston

Royal Ascot

royal-ascot

When: June 18-22
Where: Ascot, UK
What: With eight Group 1 races and an audience with Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, Royal Ascot is the highlight of the British racing calendar. Each day begins with the pageantry of the horse-drawn royal procession in front of grandstands packed with the top hats, tails and high fashion. The highlight of the festival is the prestigious Gold Cup, won by Stradivarius in 2018.

2019 Ascot Gold Cup winner: Stradivarius

Irish Derby

dubai duty free irish derby logo.jpeg

When: June 29
Where: The Curragh, County Kildare, Ireland
What: Ireland’s equivalent of The Derby, held three weeks later. Open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies, it is run over a distance of 1 mile and 4 furlongs on turf. Latrobe won the event in 2018.

2019 winner: SOVEREIGN

King George VI & Queen Elizabeth Stakes

maxresdefault.jpg

When: July 27
Where: Ascot, UK
What: Britain’s most prestigious open-age Flat race, the “King George,” is run over a distance of 1 mile and 4 furlongs. The iconic event has been won by some of racing’s biggest stars over the years. Sir Michael Stoute trained Poet’s Word won last year’s race, making Stoute the race’s most successful trainer with six wins.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: POET’S WORD

St. Leger

st leger festival.jpeg

When: September 14
Where: Doncaster, UK
What: The oldest of Britain’s five classics, dating back to 1776. The race for three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies is run over a distance of 1 mile, 6 furlongs and 115 yards. Jockey Ryan Moore won a consecutive title on board Kew Gardens in 2018.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: KEW GARDENS

When: October 6
Where: Longchamp, Paris, France
What: The Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe is a mile-and-a-half test of speed and stamina for three-year-olds and above, with a prize purse of $5.6M. The “Arc” has been held at leafy Longchamp for more than 150 years — barring a recent sojourn at Chantilly while it underwent a major redevelopment. Legendary jockey Frankie Dettori holds the record for most race wins, securing his sixth on defending champion Enable in 2018.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: ENABLE

When: October 12
Where: Sydney, Australia
What: Run over six furlongs, The Everest brings the world’s top sprinters together for the richest turf race in the world. The race’s prize pot is set to rise to $14 million in 2019 and $15 million in 2020. Redzel has clinched back-to-back titles since its inauguration in 2017.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: REDZEL

British Champions Day

BCD_PC_Horizontal_AW.png

When: October 19
Where: Ascot, UK
What: The conclusion of the British Flat racing season and the richest purse on the calendar with more than $5.4 million in prize money across six races. The legendary Frankel ran his last race here in 2012 with a 14th straight win in the Champion Stakes.

2019 Champions Stakes winner:

2018 Champions Stakes winner: CRACKSMAN

When: November 1-2
Where: Churchill Downs, Kentucky, USA
What: The Breeders’ Cup is a celebration of the very best thoroughbreds and pits US horses against the cream from the rest of the world. The highlight is the Breeders’ Cup Classic, considered the unofficial fourth leg of the Triple Crown, which is often a big factor in deciding Horse of the Year. The mile-and-a-quarter dash on dirt has been in existence since 1984, and the latest edition was won by the aptly named Accelerate. The festival also involves the Breeders’ Cup Turf — a showpiece for turf horses, carrying a prize fund of $4 million with winning connections earning $2.2 million.

2019 Breeder’s Cup Classic winner:

2018 Breeder’s Cup Classic winner: ACCELERATE

Melbourne Cup

melbourne cup.png

When: November 5
Where: Flemington, Australia
What: Having been overtaken as the country’s richest race, the Melbourne Cup is still the “race that stops a nation.” It’s been a highlight of Australia’s social and sporting calendar since 1861. Cross Counter was the 2018 winner.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: CROSS COUNTER

Japan Cup

japancup.gif

When: November 24
Where: Tokyo, Japan
What: Japan’s richest race is held every year at Tokyo Racecourse, with the world’s best three-year-olds and above descending on the country’s capital. Home-grown talent has flourished at the event, with every winning trainer and owner coming from Japan since 2008. Almond Eye is the reigning champion.

2019 winner:

2018 winner: ALMOND EYE

Hong Kong International Races

r4StlHb_fwItIU21.jpg

When: December 8
Where: Sha Tin, Hong Kong
What: It’s one of the highlights of the racing calendar, a fan favourite for decades with $12 million at stake. World class jockeys and thoroughbreds do battle over four Group 1 races on the turf of the Sha Tin Racecourse amid the skyscrapers of downtown Hong Kong. The bumper prize money is spread across the Hong Kong Sprint, the Hong Kong Vase, the Hong Kong Mile and the showpiece Hong Kong Cup.

2019 Hong Kong Cup winner:

2018 Hong Kong Cup winner: GLORIOUS FOREVER

 

 

maxresdefault (1).jpg

Longines

International Federation of HorseRacing

Authorities

Awards

 

2019 World’s Best Race Horse Award:

2018 Winner(s): Winx & Cracksman (Tie)

 

2019 World’s Best Jockey Award:

2018 Winner: Frankie Dettori

 

 

2019 World’s Best Horse Race Award:

2018 Winner: Qatar Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe

 

O’Brien Melbourne Cup hope Bondi Beach handed St Leger by stewards

The ultimate result of the St Leger at Doncaster will be decided at an appeal hearing in the basement of the British Horseracing Authority’s offices in Holborn after a dramatic renewal of the world’s oldest Classic. Simple Verse, the only filly in the race, was first past the post, a head in front of Bondi Beach, but the placings were then reversed in the stewards’ room after the panel decided that Simple Verse had caused sufficient interference to Bondi Beach in two separate incidents in the home straight to affect the outcome.

The announcement that Simple Verse, at 8-1, had been disqualified and placed behind the 2-1 joint-favourite Bondi Beach caused widespread surprise. British stewards are well known for their reluctance to amend results and work to a set of rules that tend to place the benefit of any doubt very much with the first horse over the line.

Bondi Beach had been carried across the course by Storm The Stars when narrowly beaten in the Great Voltigeur Stakes at York on his previous run – but on that occasion the officials left the result unchanged.

For the connections of Simple Verse, whose owner, Sheikh Fahad al-Thani, had paid a £50,000 supplementary fee on Monday to add her to the race, there was profound shock and bitter disappointment. Ralph Beckett, her trainer, had high-fived his way back to the winner’s enclosure while Andrea Atzeni, her jockey, was confident before the inquiry that she would keep the race.

The stewards’ decision seems certain to result in an appeal to the BHA, which would probably be heard on Thursday.

“I’m astonished, apart from anything else,” Beckett said. “There’s no consistency in the rules. We saw Stuart Williams’s horse Suzi’s Connoisseur pinned against the rail on the straight track at Ascot and Joe Fanning had to stand up in the irons and was beaten half a length but didn’t get the race.

“We lose the race when clearly both horses leaned on each other. Can you say it was entirely her fault? It’s absolutely certain we will appeal.”

Colm O’Donoghue, the rider of Bondi Beach, insisted that he had not had a fair chance to win. “It’s racing, we all want a fair shot at it,” said O’Donoghue, who was riding Aidan O’Brien’s fifth winner of the Doncaster Classic. “I had time [after the first bump] to go and get him [Atzeni], but again I got impeded. My momentum was stopped. All I know is I tried to have a fair shot at it. I got impeded and the rules have made the decision.”

Paul Barton, the stipendiary steward at Town Moor, said the officials had applied the rules in the same way as for any other race. “We first asked whether there was interference and who caused it,” he said. “In this case, we found two incidents of interference, one at about the two-furlong marker and another at about the half-furlong marker.

“We considered that both were caused by the winner and then we had to decide whether the winner had improved its placing because of the interference it caused. We didn’t consider that one individual incident had improved the placing, but the combination of the two, in our opinion, we considered it had improved the placing and therefore we reversed them.

“The incident at the two-furlong marker was a pretty hefty knock to the second, it knocked him right off his stride. The one at the half-furlong marker was not as substantial as the first but it was enough to knock him off his stride and cause him to lose ground and momentum. He was only beaten a head and was still trying to regain the ground lost.”

At Leopardstown, O’Brien said: “It was messy down the straight,” he said. “He was unlucky at York and he got two proper bumps that day and got brought right across the track. That’s the way it goes, some days it falls for you and some days it doesn’t.”

Emotionless, a son of Shamardal with just an easy maiden win behind him, made a flawless step up to Group Two company in the Champagne Stakes and is the new favourite for the 2,000 Guineas with most bookmakers at a best price of 8-1.

Charlie Appleby’s colt pulled alongside the leader Ibn Malik with a quarter of a mile to run, but William Buick had so much horse underneath him that he took a pull and did not ease into the lead until the furlong pole. Emotionless then powered clear to win by three-and-a-half lengths, with another seven lengths back to Palawan in third.

“He has an immense amount of talent,” Appleby said, “and the fact that he is still able to show it while he’s still learning is very good.

“He’s shown that he can act on easier ground, which is a bit of a relief as these are the conditions he’ll get heading into the autumn. He is in the Dewhurst and the Racing Post Trophy [over a mile] back here, but he has so much pace that we’ll stick to the seven-furlong route at Newmarket.

“It’s nice to have an exciting horse on our hands and that is potentially what he looks like.”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: